Aerospace

Advanced flight control, hydraulic, fuel, inerting, fluid conveyance, thermal management, pneumatic, and lubrication equipment. supports commercial and regional transports, military fixed-wing aircraft, general & business aviation.
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 As the Asia-Pacific aviation market continues expanding, Parker Aerospace’s two joint ventures in China have enabled Parker to grow and support a wide range of aircraft platforms throughout the region. NEIAS Parker Aero Systems and Equipment Company has obtained its AS9100 and certifications from the National Aerospace and Defense Contractors Accreditation Program (NADCAP), while the Parker FACRI Actuation Systems Company venture earned several recertifications. In addition, both organizations have recently moved into larger new facilities that will support their growing businesses.

 

Commitment to the expanding Asia-Pacific market

According to passenger demand forecasts from the International Air Transport Association, air travel passenger demand will double over the next 20 years, with the Asia-Pacific region being the biggest driver of that growth. The opportunity is not lost on Parker Aerospace; it is investing significantly in its China operations to support its OEM and aftermarket customers in China and the region.

 

"Parker is committed to the aerospace market in China. Along with our key joint venture partners, NEIAS Parker and Parker FACRI, we are investing for the future success of programs like COMAC’s C919 and ARJ-21 as well as AVIC XAC's MA700 aircraft, where Parker has large bills of materials. Parker’s joint ventures will support these and future aerospace programs in China for many years to come."

— Mark Seidel, vice president of strategic business integration, Parker Aerospace

 

NEIAS Parker Aero Systems and Equipment: expanding its footprint and focus on quality

 NEIAS Parker, located in Nanjing, China, is a joint venture between Parker Aerospace and AVIC Nanjing Engineering Institute of Aircraft Systems (NEIAS). The organization provides advanced aerospace machining for fuel, fuel inerting, and hydraulic systems and components. The NEIAS Parker facility and team produce equipment for Airbus, Boeing, and COMAC aircraft including COMAC’s C919, which successfully completed its first flight on May 5, 2017 — in addition to those produced by other aircraft manufacturers.

 

NEIAS Parker moved into its 6,800-square-meter (73,000-square-foot) facility in July 2016 and has obtained its AS9100 certification as well as certifications from the National Aerospace and Defense Contractors Accreditation Program (NADCAP). AS9100 is a quality certification earned by aerospace manufacturers based on a specific standard published by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). NADCAP is the leading worldwide cooperative program of major companies designed to manage a cost-effective consensus approach to special processes and products to provide continual improvement within the aerospace industry.

 

“Applying AS9100 requirements to our processes enables NEIAS Parker to continuously improve our operations, performance, and profitability. Obtaining AS9100 certification indicates to our customers that we have a strong quality management system, and are able to consistently meet their quality expectations at a high level. NADCAP accreditation for the facility demonstrates that our processes are in line with the global aerospace standards, enabling us to consistently meet stringent quality standards. When we can execute on both strong quality and reduced costs, it is equally beneficial for our customers and Parker Aerospace.”

— Tony Leung, general manager, NEIAS Parker


The facility’s NADCAP approvals include those for surface treatment (anodizing, chemical conversion, and passivation), non-destructive testing, magnetic particle inspection, and fluorescent penetrant inspection.

  Parker FACRI Actuation Systems Company: broadened support in China

 Parker FACRI, located in Xi’an, China, is a joint venture between Parker Aerospace and AVIC Flight Automatic Control Research Institute (FACRI). The company is an original equipment aerospace manufacturer with world-class maintenance, repair, and overhaul capabilities serving aircraft in China, including those from Airbus, Boeing, and COMAC.

Parker FACRI moved into a new 7,400-square-meter (79,000-square foot) facility in March 2017, and has since achieved AS9100C, CAAC 145, and FAA 145 re-certifications, plus NADCAP certification. The facility’s capabilities include the final assembly and testing of flight control actuation system components for the C919 and maintenance, repair, and overhaul of components on commercial aircraft flight control actuation, fuel, hydraulic, landing gear, fuel inerting, thrust reverser, and engine systems.

Further, Parker FACRI is serving as an exchange pooling center for Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 air separation modules and Airbus A330 ozone converters, and a distributor for Stratoflex Products fluid conveyance equipment. Working as a “value added” distributor, Parker FACRI has the ability to combine connectors and fittings with specific hose lengths for customized individual orders.

 

“This new facility will help Parker to grow our offerings and better serve our customers. Achieving our recertifications within just a month and a half of moving in is a testament to the robust processes and quality system we have in place. We are right on track to meet the needs of our customers. Our putting roots in Xi’an through this new larger facility shows our commitment to better serve the indigenous aircraft manufacturers and airlines operating in the world’s fastest growing aviation market. Parker FACRI provides our customers with OEM quality, global services, and local presence.”

— Cary Chua, general manager, Parker FACRI

 

To learn more about Parker Aerospace products please visit our website.

 

 This post was contributed by Mark Seidel, vice president, strategic business integration, Parker Aerospace

 

 

 

 

 

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Aerospace Technology Powers ORACLE TEAM USA in the 35th America's Cup Race - ORACLE TEAM USA Race Yacht - Parker AerospaceIn the 35th America’s Cup, ORACLE TEAM USA will compete in the AC50 race yacht, powered by the Parker Hannifin control system.

As the world leader in motion and control, Parker has combined its aerospace expertise and knowledge in flight controls along with its breadth of products to provide a lightweight, reliable and responsive hydraulic system.

With the majority of the yacht controls being fly-by-wire, the power and control to move the wing, sail and foils comes from the on-board hydraulics. This power is generated, stored and managed by the Parker products – designed and supported by the Parker team in Bermuda specifically for the America’s Cup. The control surfaces on the yacht include:

  • Daggerboard Up/Down
  • Daggerboard Pitch
  • Daggerboard Cant
  • Rudder Rake
  • Jib Sheet
  • Jib Lead
  • Jib Cunningham
  • Wing Camber
  • Wing Twist
  • Wing Inversion
  • Utilities and plumbing to connect and control the system
     

Aerospace Technology Powers ORACLE TEAM USA in the 35th America's Cup Race - ORACLE TEAM USA Race Yacht Control Surfaces - Parker Aerospace

Aerospace Technology Powers ORACLE TEAM USA in the 35th America's Cup Race - Parker Centennial - Parker AerospaceAs we move toward the America’s Cup race in 2017, we also celebrate the 100th anniversary of Parker – an achievement that brings with it extensive experience in hydraulic controls to give the team a competitive advantage to win!

 

Aerospace technology

As an innovation partner, Parker has provided engineering expertise in component and system controls to give the team an engineering solution to boat control.

Design problem

As these boats have evolved, the design problems to solve become similar to those in aircraft. The hardware must be lightweight and reliable. The control logic must optimize the operating conditions to provide fast response and high accuracy to move the control surfaces of the boat and wing.

Design solution

To achieve this, custom designs were created to meet the sailor needs using aerospace quality materials to provide high strength-to-weight characteristics with proven material properties including corrosion resistance for the demanding environment. Actuation for the control surfaces is optimized to minimize oil volume use while ensuring a capable load path for the high speed forces experienced and held in place with sealing solutions that prevent surface creep while minimizing friction.

The system incorporates aerospace type valving from Parker that is tuned within the electronics by engineers daily to continually optimize performance.

 

Aerospace Technology Powers ORACLE TEAM USA in the 35th America's Cup Race - Parker Control System - Parker Aerospace

 

Stored energy

Aerospace Technology Powers ORACLE TEAM USA in the 35th America's Cup Race - Parker Accumulators - Parker AerospaceA change to the race rule in the 35th America’s Cup is the ability for the teams to use stored energy on the boat to move control surfaces. Because these boats now travel at such high speeds while flying above the water, safety becomes of critical importance. Were the sailors to lose the control of their foils’ angle-of-attack in the water, it could have catastrophic results. Therefore, the America’s Cup committee has allowed the use of Parker's fully composite, carbon hydraulic accumulators on the boat. As the sailors grind the pumps to create hydraulic energy, they can select to port some of this oil into the accumulators. This way, there is always a reliable source of hydraulic power.

The use of accumulators is only allowed for the foil pitch control and dagger board motion in and out of the water. As you view the boat sailing, watch as the dagger boards launch out from under the boat and power into the ocean. You will see how the team is able to maintain stable flight with the pitch control.

The accumulators used are the same in the boats of all teams. They are Parker composite accumulators fabricated specifically for the 35th America’s Cup campaign and designed to meet the harsh environmental conditions and performance needs of these race boats.

 

Manually generated power

Aerospace Technology Powers ORACLE TEAM USA in the 35th America's Cup Race - ORACLE TEAM USA manually generated power- Parker AerospaceMost of the controls on the boat are now fly-by-wire. Meaning that instead of manually pulling on lines and turning winches to move surfaces of the boat in maneuvers, the crew is able to push buttons and similar cockpit controls that electrically command the operation of the boat controls. This is made possible with the use of hydraulics. As the sailors grind on the pedestals, they are manually rotating hydraulic pumps which creates pressure and oil flow that can then be commanded to move the control surfaces when desired.

  Responsive controls

This makes for a difficult engineering problem as not only are the loads on the boat changing with varied wind and boat speeds, but the pressure generated by the sailors varies. The Parker controls must be responsive across the full spectrum of these operational parameters.

Efficiency is key

The use of manually generated power using hydraulics (which is relatively inefficient) draws a thorough detail in the design of the system. Efficiency becomes king. Any wasted energy diminishes the competitive edge of the system. Therefore, every detail is reviewed: pump displacements, operating pressures, leakage, valve types, actuator sizing, plumbing sizing, lengths and bends, etc. Detailed math modeling tools are used to ensure every aspect of the system provides the best weight to performance trade off.

Energy generated

Aerospace Technology Powers ORACLE TEAM USA in the 35th America's Cup Race - ORACLE TEAM USA grinding - Parker AerospaceWith a maximum of four of the sailing crew generating hydraulic power at any time and each one producing about 300 Watts, the amount of energy available to control this high speed boat is about as much as it takes to make a small pot of coffee or toast over the course of a race.

Early in the system development, it was reviewed whether it would be more effective to use arm (grinding) or leg (cycling) for generating the necessary power. Although the results showed some potential for more power with legs, it was resolved that the crew would be able to better operate controls on the boat while grinding while being in a safer position in the event of a crash down as well as keeping their legs from getting weak when needed for traversing the boat during maneuvers.

 

Closed loop controls

Another change to the rule in the 35th America’s Cup includes the ability to use closed loop control. This means that teams can use an electrical sensor to monitor the position of the actuators that move the boat control surfaces and use that information to control where the actuator moves to at any time.

Aerospace Technology Powers ORACLE TEAM USA in the 35th America's Cup Race - Parker Intellinder - Parker AerospaceAt the speeds that the boat is flying above water, the control of the foil pitch is critical for responsiveness, accuracy and safety. For monitoring actuator position, the Parker Intellinder system is used. This is an optical sensor that is mounted to the actuator body and reads the piston position via bar code striping. By using the on-board electronics to monitor the position of the Parker actuators from the Intellinder position sensors, the sailors can command the foils to move to a position and the closed loop control algorithms position the board exactly as desired in minimal time without overshoot. The Intellinder position sensor has proved to be a reliable, lightweight and accurate means of accomplishing this task.

Although every function on the boat must be initiated by the sailors on board, this closed loop control is allowed for the rudder and board pitch control.

 

Watch this video about the Parker Intellinder System

 

To learn more about all of the Parker products used on the ORACLE TEAM USA America's Cup race yacht, view our product selector.

 

Aerospace Technology Powers ORACLE TEAM USA in the 35th America's Cup Race - Stuart Meurer, project manager on the ORACLE TEAM USA yacht, Parker AerospaceThis post was contributed by Stuart Meurer, Parker project manager on the ORACLE TEAM USA yacht, Parker Aerospace.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Innovations Drive Weight and Emission Reductions for Aircraft Engines - Airplane - Parker AerospaceEngine makers face ongoing challenges in the areas of noise, fuel burn, and emissions. That’s why Parker Aerospace’s recent innovations in the areas of lubrication, combustion, and thermal management are so important. From the first-time use of composite materials for engine lubrication reservoirs to new low-profile thermal management equipment, these recent technology innovations enhance performance, lower weight, and minimize emissions. It’s the kind of blue-sky thinking that can advance the green technology solutions needed by the entire aviation engine market: commercial, regional, business, military, and rotor.

Here’s more detail on our new engine technologies – and reimagined existing ones – that, when applied, will help launch greener aircraft engines.

  Lubrication innovations

Parker Aerospace is the first in the industry to offer composite lubrication reservoirs. These can be as much as 40 percent lighter compared to traditional reservoirs.

Additionally, we’re building on our proven demisting technology to reduce the release of oil vapor emissions. Originally developed by Parker’s Racor Division for industrial applications, the reimagined technology is now being used to separate oil droplets from vented air from the lubrication system. The separated oil is then returned to the lubrication system rather than being released into the atmosphere.

“At Parker Aerospace, we know that the first step in emissions reduction is weight reduction. When an airplane has less mass to move, it burns less fuel and creates fewer emissions. That’s where the use of lighter materials comes in, and why we are using composites in applications like our oil reservoirs. To meet other challenges, we often look first to Parker’s existing technology solutions, applying them to solve new customer problems. That was our approach in utilizing Parker’s proven demisting technology to reduce the release of oil vapor emissions.”

— Rick Mossey, business development manager, Parker Aerospace, Gas Turbine Fuel Systems Division

The ability to optimize the entire lubrication system under actual operating conditions is another engine lubrication innovation recently developed by Parker Aerospace. Our lubrication system test rig allows us to profile the entire lubrication system, building it to precisely meet customer performance requirements at the lightest possible weight.

  Innovations Drive Weight and Emission Reductions for Aircraft Engines - Parker Ecology Tank - Parker AerospaceFuel combustion advances

The engine combustor has recently been an area of focus for Parker Aerospace engineers and a number of innovations for this area have evolved. Key among them is the ecology tank. An original Parker concept, the ecology tank is installed below the engine combustor. It serves as a reservoir where unburned fuel collects for return to the main fuel tanks following engine shutdown. Ordinarily, unburned fuel can collect in the fuel nozzles, causing a buildup of deposits called coking, which impacts the nozzle’s ability to atomize fuel. When the unburned fuel is rerouted to the ecology tank, coking is avoided and fuel nozzles can then perform at peak efficiency. This creates a cleaner fuel burn, resulting in reduced emissions. Another benefit of the ecology tank is the avoidance of any overboard fuel escaping into the environment. 

Innovations Drive Weight and Emission Reductions for Aircraft Engines - Marcrospray Single Point Nozzle - Parker AerospaceFuel nozzle design is another way Parker engineers are reducing engine emissions. We’re using additive manufacturing – and working closely with customers – to develop lighter weight, more advanced fuel nozzles that use an improved fuel/air mixture with more consistently sized fuel droplets. By controlling these nozzle variables, we can continue to help our customers meet ever-more-stringent CO, CO2, and NOx emission standards. Plus, additive technology streamlines the manufacturing process, eliminating some traditional joining methods and further reducing environmental impact.

Surrounding the engine’s combustion section, fuel manifolds are often designed as a system of rigid tubing and fittings designed to deliver the fuel needed for power.  Now we’re replacing this rigid system with flexible, high-temperature fuel lines from Parker’s Stratoflex Products Division. The benefits are clear.

“Lightweight, flexible manifolds manage vibratory loads more efficiently, requiring fewer brackets; a secondary weight savings.”

— Rick Mossey, business development manager, Parker Aerospace, Gas Turbine Fuel Systems Division

  New thermal management efficiencies

Typically, in hostile engine environments, heat exchangers are used for heat removal. Traditionally, heat exchangers have had taller profiles. Now, with our proprietary macrolamination technology, we’re able to produce low-profile heat exchangers. Smaller and lighter, these new heat exchangers can occupy any available space and still provide exceptional heat removal capacity.

“Engine thermal management systems built with our macrolamination technology can realize a 40 percent gain in thermal management efficiency while reducing system size and weight. Macrolamination allows us to design systems featuring micro-cooling channels with aspect ratios as high as 30:1. This capability enables us to build lower-profile units that create less disruption to bypass air flow within the engine.”

— Rick Mossey, business development manager, Parker Aerospace, Gas Turbine Fuel Systems Division

Parker is partnering with our engine customers to share risk and develop these new innovations that will help them drive weight and emission reductions for aircraft engines.

 

Innovations Drive Weight and Emission Reductions for Aircraft Engines - Rick Mossey, business development manager -  Parker AerospaceThis blog was contributed by Rick Mossey, business development manager, Parker Aerospace, Gas Turbine Fuel Systems Division

 

 

 

 

 

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