Filtration

Filtration offers system solutions for the removal of contamination from liquids and gases, ensuring optimal performance for many applications and markets including industrial, food / beverage, bioprocessing, pharmaceutical, mobile, marine, and aerospace.
Latest Filtration Blog Posts

The Risks of Buying Counterfeit Engine Filtration Products - Tanker Truck - Parker RacorWhatever the engine, proper filtration is paramount to reliable and efficient system operation. To stay competitive, automotive and truck original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and design engineers rely on leading filtration companies to develop new technologies and advanced system solutions to address the challenges of today and tomorrow. 

Counterfeit goods pose a threat to filtration applications in the transportation industry. Counterfeit filters are going into service, without the full knowledge of OEMs or the end user, often with costly consequences.

 

The problem

Counterfeiters purport the products they produce share attributes with products that come from leading manufacturers like Parker Racor, a division of Parker Hannifin. Some counterfeiters even put forth products with the claim that they were actually manufactured by Parker Racor. Counterfeit products come from organizations all over the world, with no relation to the company manufacturing the genuine product. Counterfeiters realize that a well-known brand like Parker Racor and its reputation for high quality, fuel, air, crankcase and oil filtration systems can be a powerful selling point in the market. They look to take advantage of this, as well as the trusting customer.

 

The Risks of Buying Counterfeit Engine Filtration Products - FACTS MAGAZINE article Counteract the Counterfeit - Parker Racor

Read the article "Counteract the Counterfeit" on pages 62 and 63 of FACTS Magazine for additional information on the risks of purchasing counterfeit products.

       
Extensive development

As suppliers to the world’s leading engine manufacturers, filtration leaders must continually invest in product development and cutting-edge technology to set new standards and create innovative solutions for customers to meet today’s demanding application requirements and strict environmental regulations. Parker Racor, for example, employs a team of specialized engineers with years of practical experience partnering with customers to understand and solve their engine operation challenges today and in the future. 

 

A partnership of trust and confidentiality

The partnership between a filtration supplier and its customers is built on a foundation of trust and confidentiality. The customer shares critical technical details, intellectual property, and specifications with the supplier. This is often done under a legal agreement to ensure confidentiality between the parties. The supplier can then collaborate with the OEM to develop, fine-tune and ultimately commercialize a product. This process offers the OEM and end user a technically advanced solution, tailored specifically to the OEM’s engine application in the end user's working environment.

 

The consequences

When an OEM applies a counterfeit product, it is no longer providing the end-user with a filtration system that has been developed under the auspices of the OEM’s intellectual property and technical specifications. In fact, the counterfeiter has no direct knowledge of the specifics of the OEM’s requirements or the genuine part's technical attributes. In this case, the end user has unwittingly been placed in a position of risk that can result in performance and safety issues.


Safety

Today, a priority is placed on the safe operation of motorized vehicles and equipment, and this trend will continue into the future. End users will require more enhancements to ensure safe and reliable operation, and this need will circle back to the OEM and their suppliers. 

A filtration system operates under pressure. It is designed to ensure the fuel traveling through it stays within the system. Leaks in the system will create a broad range of safety and operational concerns. There is significant and detailed engineering that goes into the design of the filtration housings, sealing areas and media to prevent leak-related failures.

Filtration is used to protect critical engine components, like high-pressure pumps and injectors, from damage caused by liquid and solid contaminants. If the filtration system is inferior and fails, contamination can reach the components, resulting in downtime, costly maintenance and unsafe conditions for operators. 

 

The Risks of Buying Counterfeit Engine Filtration Products - Parker Racor vs Copy Element - Parker Racor

 

Counterfeit product designs will often be absent of key, but subtle features to the housings designed to prevent leakage and operational interruptions. The filtration media on the counterfeit products may, at times, strongly resemble the genuine product. However, the counterfeit will not feature the intricate chemical and material makeup that makes the genuine product a customized and effective solution to the OEM’s application challenges.

 

The Risks of Buying Counterfeit Engine Filtration Products - Parker Racor vs Copy Element - Parker Racor

  Patented Technology

End users will continue to demand higher efficiency engines to operate their equipment. In order to maximize profits, they are reliant upon the service of their equipment to do its job. This demand is driven back through the supply chain to the component manufacturers. At Parker Racor, this responsibility is taken seriously, and the investment is made to develop the best solutions for the end user's specific and evolving challenges. Breakthroughs and subtle modifications are carefully developed and, whenever possible, patented. Patented technology helps assure the end user gets the quality product they expect, and not a cheap, ineffective knock-off.  

In conclusion, it is important that OEMs carefully select their buying partners to ensure they are applying the best, safest and most effective filtration solutions to their engines.

The Risks of Buying Counterfeit Engine Filtration Products - FACTS MAGAZINE article Counteract the Counterfeit - Parker RacorRead the full FACTS Magazine article for more information on the risks of purchasing counterfeit products

 

The Risks of Buying Counterfeit Engine Filtration Products - Melanie Day, Marketing Services Manager - Parker RacorThis blog was contributed by Melanie Day, marketing services manager, Parker Engine & Mobile Filtration Division, EMEA

 

 

 

 

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Sizing a Chiller for Your Application - What You Need to Know - desert - Parker Gas Filtration and Separation DivisionWhen sizing chillers for an application, it is necessary to ensure the unit adequately sized to handle maximum process loads in worst-case site conditions. However, customers may fail to plan for these conditions and make sizing decisions based on the nominal conditions that are often presented in product brochures. This could lead to an improperly sized system that will present problems in real-world operating conditions. There are several important factors that must be considered when sizing a chiller. These include maximum ambient temperature, outlet water temperature, glycol concentration and elevation above sea level.

 

Nominal conditions

Take care when reviewing technical datasheets and brochures. Cooling capacities are often stated at a nominal condition. In North America, nominal conditions are considered as 45°F leaving water temperature, 55°F inlet water temperature and 95°F Ambient temperature. Some companies, particularly those targeting the European market, may display the cooling capacities at a very different set of conditions. In Europe, nominal conditions are defined as 15°C (59°F) leaving water temperature, 20°C (68°F) inlet water temperature and 25°C (77°F) ambient temperature. So, what’s the difference? Consider that a 10.8 kW chiller rated at 59/68/77 conditions, would perform at only 7.9 kW when rated at 45/55/95 conditions. That’s approximately a 25% difference!

 

Ambient conditions

As ambient temperature increases, the cooling capacity decreases. Referencing the example above, changing from 68°F to 95°F ambient results in a 15% derating of the cooling capacity. If the cooling capacity were calculated at a higher ambient temperature of 113°F, there would be an additional 10% derating. Inversely, when ambient temperatures are lower, the conditions at the refrigeration condenser are more favorable. This allows for reduced head pressure and increased efficiency in the refrigeration circuit, thereby increasing the available cooling capacity.

It is also important to note that the ambient temperature is not necessarily referring to the outdoor temperature. It is possible to have an 80°F outdoor air temperature, but a higher indoor air temperature. Taking this to an even more localized position, it is possible to have an average indoor air temperature that is within specification but a condition at the inlet of the condenser coil sufficient to cause a fault. This is especially true if the hot exhaust air from the chiller is re-circulated.


Water supply temperature

The desired water supply temperature also affects the cooling capacity of the chiller. As the water temperature increases, the cooling capacity will also increase. That means if a unit is rated 10 tons at 45/55/95 conditions, and the desired water temperature for the application is 40°F, the 10 ton unit will now only have 90% of the original rated capacity. This also works to a limited extent in the opposite direction. If a 10 ton unit is operated at 70°F water outlet instead of 45°F, the capacity increases by 20%.


Glycol

Outdoor installations with low ambient conditions require the use of glycol for its capability to depress the freezing point of the coolant. Many industrial glycols also include a blend of corrosion and/or biological inhibitors, which make these solutions popular for indoor applications. What many people don’t realize is that the cooling capacity of the chiller is directly affected by the use of a glycol based coolant. Due to glycol having a lower specific heat than water, a water/glycol solution is not as effective at heat transfer as plain water. While the negative effect of glycol is only about 1% capacity derating per 10% glycol solution, it is still important to factor in when sizing a chiller.

 

Altitude / elevation (above sea level)

Sizing a Chiller for Your Application - What You Need to Know - Denver Skyline - Parker Gas Filtration and Separation DivisionWhile you won’t find a chiller installed atop Mount Everest, it is not uncommon to find a chiller installed in Denver, Colorado or Toluca, Mexico. In the aptly named Mile High City, a chiller operating at 45/55/95 conditions will be working at roughly 17% lower capacity than if it were operating at the same 45/55/95 conditions at sea level. Even higher in altitude is Toluca, Mexico. The city is just shy of 9,000 ft above sea level. At such a condition, a chiller would perform at only 72% of its nominal capacity.  

 

The right solution

Sizing a Chiller for Your Application - What You Need to Know - Hyperchill Process Water Chiller - Parker Gas Filtration and Separation Division

Parker’s Hyperchill process water chillers, offer a variety of easily configurable options for all environments.

For help in sizing a chiller to fit your specific application needs, please contact Parker’s highly knowledgeable engineers at FAFquotes@parker.com. 

 

 

 

 

Sizing a Chiller for Your Application - What You Need to Know - Hyperchill Process Water Chiller - Parker Gas Filtration and Separation DivisionSizing a Chiller for Your Application - What You Need to Know - Hyperchill Process Oil Chiller - Parker Gas Filtration and Separation DivisionFor information on Parker's new Hyperchill Plus industrial water chillers and industrial oil chillers, download the product bulletins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attending FABTECH?

Learn more about Parker Industrial Chillers at FABTECH, booth A3010. FABTECH provides a convenient venue where you can meet with world-class suppliers, see the latest industry products and developments, and find the tools to improve productivity, increase profits and discover new solutions to all of your metal forming, fabricating, welding, and finishing needs. The annual event at McCormick Place will offer more than 1,700 exhibitors and 50,000 attendees full access to over 750,000 net square feet of floor space.

FABTECH 2017
November 6 - 9, 2017
McCormick Place
Chicago, IL USA
Visit Parker at booth A3010

 

 

Sizing a Chiller for Your Application - What You Need to Know - Garrett Rusin, product sales manager - Parker Gas Filtration and Separation DivisionThis post was contributed by Garrett Rusin, chiller product manager, and Jennifer Fiorello, compressed air and gas treatment technology blog team member, Parker Gas Separation and Filtration Division.

 

 

 

 

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Protecting Your Process From Mycoplasma Contamination - Mycoplasma - Parker BiosciencePlant shutdown, a shortage of key products, patients unable to access important drugs, profits hit … the consequences of a biological contamination can be devastating for a biopharmaceutical manufacturer.

Detection of a viral contamination at a manufacturing facility can halt production of drugs with significant sales loss, potential lawsuits and even decline in stock value as a result.​ 

Preventing contamination, however, poses a serious challenge for biopharmaceutical manufacturers.

Protecting Your Process From Mycoplasma Contamination - Consequences of Mycoplasma Contamination - Parker Bioscience The challenges of Mycoplasma contamination
  • Mycoplasma are slow growing and may be difficult – or impossible – to culture and detect using standard microbiological techniques.
  • Mycoplasma can infect mammalian cell cultures through adhesion and subsequent fusion to cell membranes, allowing them to exploit the conditions and synthesized molecules provided by the host cell. This means that detection and quarantine procedures must also be implemented around cell lines.
  • Mycoplasma can vary in size and shape from 0.2 microns upwards, have no peptidoglycan cell wall and exhibit pleomorphism (the ability to alter size and shape in relation to environmental conditions). This means that they are capable of penetrating sterilizing grade filtration membranes.

Protecting Your Process From Mycoplasma Contamination - Mycoplasma Threat to Bioprocessing - Parker Bioscience

 

Audience polls conducted during our webinar entitled Implementing a Risk-Management Based Approach to the Prevention of Mycoplasma Contaminations, suggested that approximately 45% of respondents were using 0.2 micron filtration to sterilize growth media. Additionally, as part of the same poll, the majority of respondents who used Mycoplasma retentive filtration indicated that they were reliant on the filter manufacturer’s Mycoplasma retention claim, generated under test conditions, using the organism Acholeplasma laidlawii.

This suggests that a high proportion of respondents are completely confident that their process is Mycoplasma free, or alternatively, do have a concern but have not conducted process specific filter validation. 

 

Solutions

Gamma irradiation or heat inactivation to eliminate mycoplasma present on gamma or heat stable incoming raw materials can be used to guard against contamination. In order to understand the true risk to a manufacturing process – and avoid the potential for increased contamination from raw materials – suitably validated detection techniques should be implemented.

In addition to detecting Mycoplasma and ideally avoiding the potential for contaminant organisms from entering a facility in the first instance, employing filtration steps to safeguard against Mycoplasma entering the biopharmaceutical process also has a vital role to play in combating contamination.

 

Filtration and automation

The use of a Mycoplasma retentive 0.1 micron filter, such as Parker’s PROPOR MR, to sterilize growth media, is recommended for mammalian cell cultures due to Mycoplasma’s ability to penetrate larger filters.

However, filtration process conditions can affect mycoplasma retention. A study was carried out by Parker to determine whether there is a link between filter pressure and retention levels using the organism Mycoplasma faucium. Challenges were conducted at different pressures with conditions continuously monitored using a SciPres® single-use pressure sensor. The results showed a clear relationship between filtration pressure and filter performance, as retention rates dropped dramatically once a threshold pressure was exceeded.

We speculate that, at this identified threshold pressure, the mechanical strength of cells present on the membrane is overcome, causing them to be deformed and forcing them through the filter pores – leading to contamination.

By automating a process, pressure levels can be constantly monitored and, if sporadic pressure peaks occur, they can be identified and controlled.

A system such as Parker’s SciFlex® NFF platform with single-use flow-path can be used to control differential pressure and maintain this below proposed threshold values at which Mycoplasma is not significantly diminished. The result is documented evidence that validated pressure limits have not been exceeded - and the peace of mind provided by a safe processing method.

 

 

Protecting Your Process From Mycoplasma Contamination - Andrew Kelly, filtration product manager - Parker Bioscience

This post was contributed by Andrew Kelly, filtration product manager - life sciences, Parker Process Filtration, United Kingdom.

Parker specializes in automating and controlling single-use processes. By integrating sensory and automation technology into a process, a manufacturer can control the fluid more effectively, ensuring the quality of the final product. Find out more at our dedicated bioprocessing microsite.

 

 

 

 

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Protecting Your Process From Mycoplasma Contamination

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 Your filter has a differential pressure gauge or a pop-up indicator on the top of it. Great, but what is it telling you? Here are a few helpful hints to understand how these indicators work, what the readings mean, and the best time to take accurate readings.

 

What the indicators do

Differential gauges and pop-up indicators on filters provide a visual reading of the pressure on the inlet versus the outlet side of the filter element. 

This only works under a flow condition. Reading this pressure differential is important to monitor the condition of the element. As the filter becomes plugged with particulate matter and other various contaminants, the flow restriction through the element increases, resulting in reduced efficiency and increased energy consumption. These indicators must be read under a flow condition to get an accurate reading. 

 

How to read gauge and pop-up type indicators

Gauge type indicators are color coded to indicate when to change the element.

Differential Pressure Gauges on Filters - How and When to Take Accurate Readings - How to Read Gauge Table - Gas Separation and Filtration Division

Pop-up type indicators include a red piston to indicate when to change the element.

Differential Pressure Gauges on Filters - How and When to Take Accurage Readings - Piston When to Change Element Table - Gas Separation and Filtration Division

 

When to read the indicators

It’s 5:00 A.M., the plant is not up and running yet. What a perfect time to go look at all of the indicators on the filters to see if any of the elements need to be changed and get that out of the way before the plant starts up. Don’t do it.  There is no flow going through the filters. Even a filter element that is 95 percent clogged will give a false “good – or green” reading if no flow is going through the filter.

Pick a time when the plant is up and running and the machines are consuming air to take a visual reading of the differential pressure indicators. This is when you will know the actual condition of the element. Take a quick walk around with a pad of colored sticky notes and stick one to each filter where the indicator is telling you to change the element. Come back at 5:00 A.M. the next morning and change out the elements before the plant is up and running. 

 

Show me

View the SlideShare below to see how differential pressure indicators work and what they tell you. You can also see the effects a dirty filter element has on your plant’s electricity consumption:

 

 This post was contributed by Lee Scott, product manager and Jennifer Fiorello, compressed air and gas treatment technology blog team member, Parker Hannifin Gas Separation and Filtration Division.

 

 

 

 

Related posts:

What You Need to Know About Coalescing Filtration 
Condition Monitoring Solutions for Power Generation Plants

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Differential Pressure Gauges on Filters - How and When to Take Accurate Readings

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 Your filter has a differential pressure gauge or a pop-up indicator on the top of it. Great, but what is it telling you? Here are a few helpful hints to understand how these indicators work, what the readings mean, and the best time to take accurate readings.

 

What the indicators do

Differential gauges and pop-up indicators on filters provide a visual reading of the pressure on the inlet versus the outlet side of the filter element. 

This only works under a flow condition. Reading this pressure differential is important to monitor the condition of the element. As the filter becomes plugged with particulate matter and other various contaminants, the flow restriction through the element increases, resulting in reduced efficiency and increased energy consumption. These indicators must be read under a flow condition to get an accurate reading. 

 

How to read gauge and pop-up type indicators

Gauge type indicators are color coded to indicate when to change the element.

Differential Pressure Gauges on Filters - How and When to Take Accurate Readings - How to Read Gauge Table - Gas Separation and Filtration Division

Pop-up type indicators include a red piston to indicate when to change the element.

Differential Pressure Gauges on Filters - How and When to Take Accurage Readings - Piston When to Change Element Table - Gas Separation and Filtration Division

 

When to read the indicators

It’s 5:00 A.M., the plant is not up and running yet. What a perfect time to go look at all of the indicators on the filters to see if any of the elements need to be changed and get that out of the way before the plant starts up. Don’t do it.  There is no flow going through the filters. Even a filter element that is 95 percent clogged will give a false “good – or green” reading if no flow is going through the filter.

Pick a time when the plant is up and running and the machines are consuming air to take a visual reading of the differential pressure indicators. This is when you will know the actual condition of the element. Take a quick walk around with a pad of colored sticky notes and stick one to each filter where the indicator is telling you to change the element. Come back at 5:00 A.M. the next morning and change out the elements before the plant is up and running. 

 

Show me

View the SlideShare below to see how differential pressure indicators work and what they tell you. You can also see the effects a dirty filter element has on your plant’s electricity consumption:

 

 This post was contributed by Lee Scott, product manager and Jennifer Fiorello, compressed air and gas treatment technology blog team member, Parker Hannifin Gas Separation and Filtration Division.

 

 

 

 

Related posts:

What You Need to Know About Coalescing Filtration 
Condition Monitoring Solutions for Power Generation Plants

Technologies for Drying Compressed Air: Aftercoolers and Coalescing Filters
What’s the Best Line of Defense against Microbial Contamination of Food? Part 6 of 6

 

Differential Pressure Gauges on Filters - How and When to Take Accurate Readings

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Eliminating Leaks and Faults: Single-Use vs Stainless Steel Systems - Water Splash - Parker domnick hunter Process Filtration DivisionEnsuring process integrity – which means being able to effectively test for leaks – is a critical factor in biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes, especially given the high value placed on drug products and the potency of the products being produced.

 

It’s a factor in some cases that has led to a delay in the adoption of single-use technology and a continued reliance on stainless steel systems when a similar testing regime has been demanded. This issue is one of five critical challenges in single-use bioprocessing.

 

With stainless steel systems, integrity is tested by pressurizing the system and holding it at a known pressure for many hours looking for a drop in pressure to test for leaks. This high-pressure method of testing can’t be applied to single-use assemblies, as they are manufactured from flexible polymeric materials.

 

Instead, manufacturers employ visual inspection and low-pressure decay testing to ensure the integrity of single-use assemblies. This has caused a certain level of concern, with some end users worried about the level of assurance these methods offer.

 

However, despite our knowledge of stainless steel systems and how to test them, it could, in fact, be viewed as having a higher risk of leaks compared to single-use assemblies.

 

Stainless steel components and pipework must be repeatedly cleaned and sterilized, placing significant thermal stress on the system’s integrity, not to mention operational flexibility. In addition, stainless steel systems contain multiple line connections and during steam sterilization are subject to an extreme level of temperature fluctuation.  

Eliminating Leaks and Faults: Single-Use vs Stainless Steel Systems - Weaknesses of Stainless Steel Systems- Parker domnick hunter Process Filtration Division


Application of quality by design to single-use assembly manufacturing

Quality by design (QbD) is a strategy employed to ensure integrity in building single-use systems, not just with the final product. By applying this methodology to the integrity and quality throughout the entire manufacturing process, quality assurance is built in from the start of the manufacturing process.

 

The single-use assembly manufacturing process starts by identifying areas of risk throughout the process and then continues by developing best practices and procedures to minimize risks. In Parker's own single-use assembly manufacturing operations, several methods have been employed to build quality and integrity into the process.

 

These include:

  • Carefully selecting raw material and component suppliers and ensuring that they meet current biopharmaceutical regulations (such as USP <88> — Biological Reactivity, USP <661> — Containers — Plastics) as well as gamma stability and rigorous in-house testing of physical properties

 

  • Minimizing risk of assembly damage by manufacturing in a purpose-built ISO Class 7 cleanroom, where furniture and equipment has rounded edges when possible to avoid punctures, and any sharp edges are shielded

 

  • Ensuring connections are robust by clamping to a defined torque setting so they do not leak under the validated operating conditions

 

  • Performing a final visual inspection and low-pressure decay test of assemblies before packaging

 

  • Shipping assemblies via a validated method, ASTM4169 to ensure they arrive at the customer site undamaged

 

Eliminating Leaks and Faults - Single-Use vs Stainless Steel Systems - White paper - Parker domnick hunter Process Filtration Division

Read the full white paper: Single-Use Technology: The Next 5 Challenges to Conquer

 

 

 

 

 

Eliminating Leaks and Faults - Single-Use vs Stainless Steel Systems - Graeme Proctor, product manager - Parker domnick hunter Process Filtration Division

This post was contributed by Graeme Proctor, product manager - single-use technologies, Parker domnick hunter Process Filtration Division, United Kingdom

 

 

 

 

Parker domnick hunter Process Filtration Division specializes in automating and controlling single-use bioprocesses. By integrating sensory and automation technology into a process, a manufacturer can control the fluid more effectively, ensuring the quality of the final product. Visit our bioprocessing microsite to find out more.

 

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