Hydraulics

Hydraulics is the technology of controlling pressurized fluids to create force and motion. Parker hydraulics enable and improve machinery performance.
Latest Hydraulics Blog Posts

 Dump pumps have long been the standard in the dump truck and trailer segment. The cost-effectiveness of a combination pump and valve with a built-in relief has been a winning combination in the North American marketplace for decades. 

Trucks are constantly evolving and space for hydraulics has become a major issue. In today’s fast-paced world, the dump body lifting speed requirements are increasing. As a result, most fleets require pumps with larger volumetric displacements and that presents a problem - there’s often no room left next to the truck's transmission for a larger pump with a built-in valve. Newer trucks have more exhaust piping, DEF tanks, diesel particulate filters, SCR catalysts, tighter frame rails, heat shields and several other obstructions that just weren’t an issue 10 years ago.

 

Using a smaller combination pump and valve, for example, Parker’s G101/102 Series dump pumps, won’t deliver the same dump body lifting speed performance. Now, there’s another option that has entered the market.

 

 

 

 

Our CVA16 tipper valve can be used with the PGP051/PGP350 series gear pumps and with most fixed displacement hydraulic pumps. Unlike traditional valves, this valve can be placed anywhere along the chassis of the truck, helping to eliminate spatial constraints. 

 

  Value-added

For such a small component, the benefits are substantial. In addition to solving the problem of space, the CVA16 tipper valve is:

  • extremely cost-effective - the tipper valve should last the life of your truck;

  • very robust and not overly sensitive to contamination;

  • easy to install and the only one on the market today that comes with an owner's manual and installation guide;

  • available for purchase from any Parker Distributor that carries gear pumps;

  • available as single or dual pressure, with cable and air shift options; 

  • three different in-cab console options to pair with the valves;

  • easy to plumb.

 

 

 

Air shift

The air shift version comes standard with a ¼” SAE DOT push-to-connect fitting.

Dual pressure

You can use this version of the valve to operate systems requiring two different pressure settings. The low-pressure setting can be used for a dump hoist and the high-pressure setting can be used for a moving floor or another circuit requiring higher pressures.

In today's rapidly evolving world where taking chances could mean not getting the job done, Parker is there with the tools to make maintaining your truck easy. If your work trucks demand a high-displacement dump pump but don't have space for one, the CVA16 tipper valve series is a cost-effective solution.

Download the brochure or owner's manual for specs and installation guide for more information.

 

Meeting Your Work Truck's Demand for More Hydraulics Space  - Nicholas Roberto, National Sales Manager - Parker HannifinArticle contributed by Nicholas Roberto, national sales manager, Vocational Truck Team, Parker Hannifin.

 

 

 

 

Related, helpful content for you:

3 Easy Steps to Configure a Wetline Kit for Your Work Truck

How Variable Speed Drives Become Simpler and More Efficient

Load Sensing Valve Improves Heavy Duty Machine Productivity and Fuel Savings

Electronic Control Systems for Heavy-Duty Vehicle Implements

 

Meeting Your Work Truck's Demand for More Hydraulics Space

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Hydraulic Fan Drives: Efficiency Driven - constuction equipment - Motion Systems Group

Looking to improve the efficiency of your construction equipment? Consider a hydraulic fan drive. Compared to mechanically driven fans, hydraulic fan drives provide several advantages. This is proven across multiple markets and applications.

The proof is in the productivity

Because most vehicles already have a hydraulic system in place, it’s easy to switch to hydraulic fan drives. Once in place, the fan can be decoupled from the engine speed so no excess cooling is generated. The fan can now run at the necessary speed regardless of engine speed. This creates amazing efficiencies: total overall efficiency gained can range from 70% - 90% depending on the system.

Hydraulic Fan Drives: Efficiency Driven - Fan Drive White Paper Download - Parker Hannifin

Hydraulic Fan Drives: efficiency Driven -  White Paper Download Button - Parker Hannifin         Better fuel economy

One critical efficiency is in fuel savings. Compared to a mechanical drive, a hydraulic fan drive system can save one gallon of fuel per day. This can amount to $600 in savings per vehicle per year (based on $3.00 per gallon diesel fuel and 200 work days per year).

Engine power available for useful work

Another area of efficiency is in power consumption. Because the fan drive is consuming less power, it allows for the freed up power to be employed doing useful work. The result: a more productive vehicle.

The benefits are abundant

Additional benefits include the ability to control the engine temperature. By using temperature sensors, highs and lows can be set, turning the fan on and off accordingly. Hydraulic fans also have the ability to reverse motion, which can clean radiators by blowing the dirt and debris out. And hydraulic fans can be mounted remotely, freeing up space for other components.

Compliance that’s sustainable

Lastly, but importantly, hydraulic fan drives are vital to complying with Tier IV emissions regulations. That’s the true power of hydraulic fan drives. Parker is a global leader in motion and control technologies and a pioneer in hydraulic fan drives.

For in-depth details on hydraulic fan drive options, download the white paper.  For additional construction equipment content from Parker, visit www.parker.com/buildingbetterlives.  

 

Hydraulic Fan Drives: Efficiency Driven Andrew De JongArticle contributed by Andrew De Jong, engineer, Parker Hannifin Corporation, Global Mobile Systems.

 

 

 

Related content:

Top Innovative Products and Systems for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

Electronic Control Systems for Heavy-Duty Vehicle Implements

Load Sensing Valve Improves Heavy Duty Machine Productivity and Fuel Savings

 

 

Hydraulic Fan Drives: Efficiency Driven

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Split Pump IFC on a Wheel Loader: Simply Smarter - wheel loader - Motion Systems Group

For increased simplicity, reliability and energy savings from your wheel loader, consider the proven results of split pump Intelligent Flow Control (IFC) architecture. 

 

Typical Wheel Loader Architecture

For the most part, wheel loaders are currently employing a system featuring load-sensing technology, the main functions being steering and implement control.  This system can utilize a single pump for both functions or two pumps.  While this architecture has been practical, it can now be surpassed.

 

Split Pump IFC on a Wheel Loader: Simply Smart - download button - White Paper accessSplit Pump IFC on a Wheel Loader: Simply Smart - download white paper - Parker Hannifin

          Intelligent Flow Control Architecture

The Parker Global Mobile Systems team created an innovative concept that reduces system complexity while increasing efficiency and performance.  The system uses two electric displacement controlled pumps and an electronically controlled open center valve with three sections.  Now, each function can use full flow from both pumps during a single function operation, and a dedicated pump during multi-function operations for optimal energy balance. 

 

Split Pump IFC on a Wheel Loader: Simply Smarter - Chart with Load Sense System versus Split Pump IFC - Parker Hannifin

IFC Value Analysis

In tests, the split pump IFC system used 24% less hydraulic energy compared to the baseline load-sensing system.  In fuel consumption, this translates to fuel savings of 1.8 gallons per day, which could save $900 yearly per vehicle.

    Advantages Over a Traditional Load-Sensing System

Simplified architecture – using open center valves with an electronic displacement control pump reduces failure points, leak paths and cost.

Reduced energy losses – by controlling flow to specific functions, losses through the valve are minimized.

Improved response time – by using an electric control pump, the time from operator input to pump stroking is reduced.

 

Control Flexibility – with IFC, the exact amount of flow required can be controlled.

Parker is a global leader in motion and control technologies and the creator of split pump Intelligent Flow Control (IFC) architecture.

For in-depth details on Split Pump IFC, download the white paper.  And for additional construction equipment content from Parker, visit www.parker.com/buildingbetterlives

 

Split Pump IFC on a Wheel Loader: Simply Smarter - David Schulte

Article contributed by David Schulte, systems engineer, Parker Hannifin Corporation, Global Mobile Systems.

 

 

 

 

Related content

Top Innovative Products and Systems for Heavy-Duty Vehicles

Electronic Control Systems for Heavy-Duty Vehicle Implements

Load Sensing Valve Improves Heavy Duty Machine Productivity and Fuel Savings

 

 

Split Pump IFC on a Wheel Loader: Simply Smarter

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Variable Flow Open Center Delivers Constant Efficiency - Backhoe - Motion Systems Group

As hydraulic systems on construction equipment continue to evolve, the goal of increasing simplicity, reliability and productivity remains the same.  Parker Variable Flow Open-Center (VFO) takes a big step towards realizing these objectives.

Typical Hydraulic System Layouts

The most common hydraulic systems on mobile equipment are based on two designs: an open-center valve technology with fixed displacement pumps or load-sensing (LS) valve technology with variable or fixed displacement pumps.  Both of these arrangements have their benefits.  The open-center system, for example, is simple, cost-effective and provides the operator with a less jarring operation.

Variable Flow Open-Center

Variable Flow Open-Center innovatively employs a variable displacement pump controlled by an open-center type valve.  The result: VFO integrates the advantages of the current technologies (simplicity, cost-effectiveness, smooth operation) with the energy efficiency of piston pumps.

Variable Flow Open Center delivers constant efficiency graph VFO In Brief

The distinct value of the Variable Flow Open-Center system can be seen from several perspectives:

Simplicity: There are no compensators and shuttle networks (Open-Center Valve Technology).

Reliability: In general, less complexity means more dependability (Open-Center Valve Technology).

Productivity: The system optimizes the energy balance of variable-pump technology.

Applicability: It can work with any valve control type without the need for electronics.

Parker is a global leader in motion and control technologies and a pioneer in the Variable Flow Open-Center (VFO) system.

For in-depth details on our Variable Flow Open-Center, download the white paper.  And for additional construction equipment content from Parker, visit www.parker.com/buildingbetterlives

Article contributed by Germano Franzoni, Ph.D., Senior Systems Engineer, Parker Hannifin Corporation, Global Mobile Systems.

Variable Flow Open Center Delivers Constant Efficiency Germano FranzoniArticle contributed by Germano Franzoni, Ph.D., Senior Systems Engineer, Parker Hannifin Corporation, Global Mobile Systems.

 

Hydraulic Technologies and Key Markets
Load Sensing Valve Improves Heavy Duty Machine Productivity and Fuel Savings

Electronic Control Systems for Heavy-Duty Vehicle Implements

Variable Flow Open Center Delivers Constant Efficiency

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New coating Extends Cylinder Actuator Life up to Eight Times Longer - Hydro Dam image. Parker Hannifin Industrial Cylinder Division Hydroelectric turbine systems operate in extremely harsh conditions. The corrosive conditions in challenging industrial and outdoor environments, especially in hydro market applications, greatly shorten the life of operational parts, such as cylinders and actuators. 

Advanced cylinder coating resists corrosion

Parker Hannifin Corporation has developed an advanced cylinder-rod coating called Global ShieldTM that resists corrosion up to eight times longer than conventional coatings. Global Shield outperforms standard coatings like hard chrome, nitride, electroless nickel and hard chrome over electroless nickel when tested against the corrosive properties of salt spray, calcium chloride spray and magnesium chloride spray.

Global Shield technology

Global Shield was developed in direct response to customer demands for an environmentally-responsible, corrosion-resistant coating that significantly reduces downtime associated with cylinder repairs and seal replacements. The Global Shield coating has a sub-micron structure that eliminates surface micro-cracks and delamination, especially when flexure occurs.

Extensive lab and field testing have validated the coating’s performance against corrosion and dynamic wear. Cylinders protected with Global Shield have demonstrated resistance to corrosion up to eight times longer than conventional coatings. Tests also confirm leak-free performance even after 1 million cycles and 2,000 hours of salt spray. When compared to hard chrome and tested using the Rockwell “C” Indentation Test, protocol, Global Shield exhibited exceptional interfacial adhesion and impact resistance, with almost no micro-cracking, chipping, spalling or delamination.

New coating extends Cylinder life up to eight times longer - Global Shield Coating image - Parker Hannifin Industrial Cylinder Division Compared to traditional rod coatings, Global Shield provides the following advantages:

  • Significantly improves corrosion resistance—a result of the single-layer, fully-dense, submicron structure and the lack of micro-cracks
  • Lower friction
  • Ductile and tough—when the rod bends, so does the coating
  • Engineered hardness (HRC 54 minimum) for wear-resistance

As a result, fewer cylinder repairs and seal replacements (and therefore less downtime) provide a longer life in corrosive environments. This results in lower service costs, because the piston rod does not have to be replaced as a result of corrosion.

Another benefit of Global Shield is that it’s good for the environment. No chromium is required in the coating or the manufacturing process, which eliminates hexavalence, hazardous waste stream risks and PEL (personal exposure limits) concerns and complies with RoHS Directive 2011/65/EU regarding recyclable coating materials.

Global Shield can be easily applied during original Parker cylinder manufacture or installed during aftermarket cylinder maintenance via a process that is both efficient and environmentally responsible. Global Shield is an available option for nearly all Parker cylinder sizes.

Applications abound

The ability of Global Shield rod coating technology to resist corrosion from salt spray, calcium chloride spray, magnesium chloride spray and other environmental conditions makes it ideal for challenging industrial applications. It is well-suited for hydro-oriented applications such as hydroelectric and marine/intermodal operations. Other industrial applications include mining, construction, material handling, renewable energy and power generation, refuse, oil and gas, military, heavy-duty trucking, forestry and other challenging industrial and mobile environments.

New Coating Extends Cylinder life up to eight times longer - corrosion performance testing chart - Parker Hannifin Industrial Cylinder Division

Compared to chrome, chrome over nickel or other multi-layer/multi-process rod-plating technologies, Global Shield will improve cylinder performance with better initial and long-term ownership costs. It may also be an economic alternative to corrosion resistant steels when applied to carbon steel.

New Coating Extends Cylinder life up to eight times longer - cross section view of cylinder with global shield coating - Parker Hannifin Industrial Cylinder Division

 

 
Are you attending Solar Power International?

Please join our Energy Platform Solutions team at Solar Power International show, September 10-13 at Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas, NV. Visit our engineers at booth 1545 and see end-to-end solutions for solar, grid-tie and energy storage applications. Get a sneak peek of our featured products on demo by visiting our energy platform solutions page

 

 Article contributed by Rade Knezevic, Business Development Manager, Parker Hannifin Industrial Cylinder Division

 

 

 

 

Additional resources on this topic:

Smart Hydraulic Cylinder Optimizes Hydroelectric Dam Gate Control

Global Shield is the Greener Path to Corrosion Protection

Smart Cylinders Reduce Operational Costs

Hydraulic Power Units Control All Functions of Hydro-electric Turbine

Innovative New Fluid Purifier Saves Time, Money in Hydroelectric Plants

 

New Coating Extends Cylinder Life Up to Eight Times Longer

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New Steel Coiling Technology Reduces Motor Size Requirements - Steel Coiler Image - Parker HannifinA common method of coiling and uncoiling processed steel web is center winding. Steel coilers are powered by electric variable speed drives and motors. Large motors are usually selected for coiling / uncoiling applications because of the high torque and speed demands placed on the motor. This blog explores a new technology for the steel coiling process that allows fluid power and drive system engineers to:

  • Reduce motor size requirements
  • Lower installation costs
  • Improve coiling process efficiency
  • Minimize hydraulic losses
  • Operate at lower noise levels and temperatures

 

Torque and speed demands

A fine balance between torque and speed is required throughout the coiling and uncoiling process. The coiler motor’s speed and torque change inversely proportional of one and other due to tension created by the buildup of material. As the roll builds during coiling, its circumference increases, consuming more material with each rotation. To keep up, the coiler must slow down with each added layer. The buildup of material causes the coiling arm to increase. To maintain tension, the coiler must increase torque proportional to the coil diameter. This process requires maximum torque from the motor when the coil is full, and maximum speed when at the core.

 

New Steel Coiling Technology Reduces Motor Size Requirements - New Coiling Technology White Paper - Parker HannifinTo learn how to optimize the steel coiling / uncoiling process, download this white paper.

 

 

 

 

 

 

How the coiling and uncoiling process works Coil buildup

The coiler buildup is the ratio of full coil original diameter to core/spindle original diameter.

Example: if a 72” roll has a core/spindle diameter of 24”, it has a 3:1 buildup ratio for coiling and 3:1 builddown ratio for uncoiling.

New Steel Coiling Technology Reduces Motor Size Requirements - Coiler Buildup - Parker Hannifin

Coiling torque

To maintain its tension, the coiler motor has to produce sufficient torque to pull the material at the necessary process tension. An electric motor transmits any remaining torque to the spindle.

To calculate the required torque, multiply the web tension by the coil radius. The required motor torque will increase proportionally to the coil buildup.

New Steel Coiling Technology Reduces Motor Size Requirements - Coiler Torque - Parker Hannifin

Coiling speed

In order to maintain tension, a coil needs to match its surface speed to the incoming web speed at all times during the process. To calculate the spindle speed, divide the web speed by the coil circumference. 

New Steel Coiling Technology Reduces Motor Size Requirements - Coiler Power - Parker Hannifin

Coiling power

During buildup, web tension and line speed are constant; therefore, the coiling power requirements remain constant and equal to the web horsepower

The motor must reduce speed inversely proportional to torque during the buildup process. As the motor slows down during buildup, its output power reduces. As a result, once the coil reaches its full diameter, the motor is only running at one third of the speed. The maximum horsepower also drops by one third.

A larger motor is needed to meet the required maximum torque and speed requirements.

 

Reducing horsepower requirements

Drive system engineers can reduce the required horsepower through the use of different types of electric motors. For example, by using an eight-pole 900 RPM base speed motor, its size can drop to approximately 137 HP.

There are currently many DC electric motors in use. However, they are inefficient and no longer manufactured. They are still used in many steel plants because of how difficult they are to upgrade or replace.

 

Combined technologies

Hydraulic systems are known for their power density and delivery. Electric motors and variable speed drives are great for their programmability and responsiveness. The idea of combining these two technologies has been floated around by fluid power and drive system engineers for years now. Today, concerns about the higher costs of electricity and the CO2 footprint have prompted a reevaluation of these technologies. 

 

Drive controlled pumps 

Advancements in new variable frequency drive (VFD) control algorithms, faster programmable VFDs, and more efficient hydraulic pumps allow fluid power and drive system engineers to successfully implement a new technology called drive controlled pumps (DCP).  

 

"DCP hydraulic systems are less complex and more efficient than traditional hydraulic systems. They operate at a much lower noise level and temperature, resulting in quieter and cooler surroundings."

— Rashid Aidun, application engineer, Parker Hannifin

 

DCP controlled coiling

While traditional methods of coiling use larger motors to meet the maximum torque and speed demands, DCP uses a variable ratio hydraulic transmission to keep the motor size closer to the web horsepower. 

To use DCP, the mechanical gearbox is replaced with a hydraulic pump and motor with the same displacement ratio. This produces the same speed reduction. Also, a hydraulic motor with a variable volume that offsets the buildup can be selected. A variable ratio allows the motor to run at full speed while maintaining the constant horsepower requirement. 

When the coiler runs at its minimum diameter, the hydraulic motor is set to its minimum displacement, allowing the hydraulic motor to run at its maximum speed. Essentially, when the pump runs at a smaller displacement, it produces a lower torque and a higher speed, making the process more efficient. 

 

Conclusion

DCP technology combines the best features of electrical and hydraulic systems to optimize the coiling and uncoiling process resulting in:

  • Smaller motor requirement
  • Reduced electric and drive system and installation costs
  • Low heat generation
  • Improved operating efficiency
  • Minimal hydraulic losses
  • Fewer, less complicated hydraulic valves
  • Lower noise levels

 

New Steel Coiling Technology Reduces Motor Size Requirements - Download White Paper - Parker HannifinTo learn more about the theory behind DCP technology and how it improves coiling and uncoiling process efficiency, download this white paper.

 

New Steel Coiling Technology Reduces Motor Size Requirements - Rashid Aidun, application engineer - Parker HannifinThis blog was contributed by Rashid Aidun, application engineer, Parker Hannifin.

 

 

 

 

 

Related posts

How to Select the Right Motors & Drives for High Speed Spindle Applications

How Variable Speed Drives Become Simpler and More Efficient

The Hydraulic Solution for the Evolution of Electric Drives

 

 

Improve Steel Coiling Process Efficiency With DCP

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